Display settings > Advanced display settings > Display adapter properties > Monitor tab, Windows Vista/7/8/8.1: right-click on the desktop > Screen resolution > Advanced settings > Monitor tab. Then the list should only have entries that are currently active. Custom Resolution Utility is a program for «screen acceleration» of the monitor (increasing screen refresh frequency). Since I have an ATI/AMD card, I followed Black Zero's link (can be found in video description) and then selected the link in his 3rd Edit. As of 2017 this problem is finally fixed with the newer Intel drivers. Custom Resolution Utility – CRU is an efficient software that is recommended by many Windows PC users. It’s called Custom Resolution Utility and you can download it here. Use VTB-EXT to add more standard resolutions. Option 1: Temporarily install the legacy… Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) is an EDID editor that focuses on custom resolutions. Note: NVIDIA requires at least 2 bytes left for data blocks or the driver may crash or ignore the override. Scaled Resolution Editor – Create a new program to edit the list of scaled resolutions that are automatically added by the graphics driver. Workarounds are no longer required for NVIDIA. List inactive displays with overrides installed, Display properties: interpret "0" ID serial number as blank, Detailed resolutions: "LCD reduced" will no longer go below 56 horizontal blanking, DisplayID detailed resolutions: fixed interlaced calculations to match DisplayID standard, HDMI 2.0 support: enable "SCDC present" by default when adding new data blocks, Added .csv file export: outputs comma-separated hexadecimal values (one block per line), Added .exe file export: outputs self-contained EDID override installers (includes alternative method for Intel GPUs), reset-all.exe: Reset alternative method for Intel GPUs, added /q option, restart.exe/restart64.exe: Faster restarts, recovery mode includes alternative method for Intel GPUs, added /r option, Speaker setup: added new speakers from CTA-861-G, HDMI support: fixed undefined latency data saving as 2 ms (since 1.3.99-p1), HDMI 2.0 support: preserve additional fields for HDMI 2.1, FreeSync range: added support for editing FreeSync 2 ranges, Added support for HDR static metadata blocks. Custom Resolution Utility - CRU makes it possible for users to define new resolutions for their AMD/ATI or NVIDIA GPUs on Windows Vista and later. Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) is an EDID editor that focuses on custom resolutions. Download and run the Custom Resolution Utility. Change timing to Automatic - LCD Standard. By Aaron P Brezenski, Published: ... in order to cope with monitor/video card driver mismatches, specialized software such as EnTech's excellent PowerStrip utility had to be used for all graphics cards, especially if you had overscan/underscan issues. Shifted the range up to 57-144 with CRU and it seems to work really well (though I'm still testing it out). "Automatic - LCD standard" uses standard timing parameters commonly used with LCD monitors and HDTVs. TUTORIAL STARTS AT 2:38really excited to get this tutorial out for you guys. Open the Intel Graphics Driver properties windows by pressing Ctrl + Alt + F12 or right-clicking on … This may help when trying higher refresh rates. Extension blocks that can't be read will appear as default extension blocks. Here's a screenshot: I just checked with a 1080p monitor. On the Display Devices tab, check if the Custom Resolutions/Modes button is available. Add custom resolutions, remove unwanted resolutions, edit FreeSync ranges, and more. What video card and monitor are you using? For HDMI monitors, edit the FreeSync data block in the first extension block. But there are a couple of … Add custom resolutions, remove unwanted resolutions, edit FreeSync ranges, and more. This is obviously bogus because the very same hardware does output that resolution in Ubuntu. Custom Resolution Utility 1.4.1 is available to all software users as a free download for Windows 10 PCs but also without a hitch on Windows 7 and Windows 8. This stops happening if I change the 60 Hz resolution to something like 59.94 Hz. Use detailed resolutions for other refresh rates. NVIDIA and newer AMD cards can handle some lower values depending on the resolution and refresh rate. Step 2: Open this tool and you can see the box of Detailed resolutions . Additional resolutions will use up detailed resolution slots. Using this software, you can change the resolution of a single monitor or even multimonitor setups. Restart the driver again to reload any changes. Do not add the native resolution as a standard resolution. The video card will not reduce clock speeds when idle if the vertical blanking/total is too low. Download: cru-1.4.2.zip - Source: cru-1.4.2-src.zip In the past, attempting to add custom resolutions/refresh rates on intel or switchable graphics in Windows was not possible. A word of warning: the application doesn’t work with Intel display adapters, and it functions by making edits to your registry. A separate x64 version may be available from ToastyX. Custom Resolution Utility – CRU is a Cleaning and Tweaking application like WinUtilities, Passware, and Uninstaller from ToastyX. I had a similar experience with my MG279Q. Use CEA-861 unless you need more standard resolutions. The program is a specialized tool, and it is likely that most Windows users have no need for it. CRU adds monitor resolutions, not scaled resolutions. Update Sept 22: The custom resolution editor within the official Intel Command Center is broken as of August 2020 - instead you can try the older "BETA" command center. 4th generation (Haswell) for Windows 7/8.1: Older Intel GPUs are supported using the alternative method described below. Display properties: added support for ID serial number in EDID header, Detailed resolutions: added "Automatic - Old standard" timing option for GTF, TV resolutions: added new resolutions from CTA-861-G (requires driver support), Colorimetry: added DCI-P3 standard from CTA-861-G, Fixed .inf export for Windows 10 Creators Update, Detailed resolutions: use CEA-861 timing parameters for 3840x2160 @ 60 Hz with "LCD standard" (use "LCD reduced" for old values), TV resolutions: disable "Native format" for resolutions that don't support this option, Do not add blank extension block if no extension blocks exist by default, Allow invalid but possible product IDs when editing display properties, Fixed '&' character in monitor name and serial number not displaying correctly in detailed resolutions list box, Improved row spacing between UI elements with higher DPI settings, Added support for reading extension blocks from connected monitors with AMD/ATI and NVIDIA, Automatically add blank extension block in registry and exported .inf files to work around NVIDIA driver issues, Added support for multiple extension blocks, Added support for importing other types of extension blocks, Added support for VTB-EXT extension blocks (detailed/standard resolutions only), Changed default TMDS clock to 340 MHz for new HDMI data blocks, Added support for HDMI FreeSync data blocks, Added BT.2020 formats in colorimetry data blocks, Added text file export (outputs hex values), Improved UI scaling with higher DPI settings, restart.exe/restart64.exe: fix Start menu, search box, and Radeon Settings not responding after restarting, Fixed a bug affecting non-PnP monitors since 1.2.3 (invalid EDID version with new overrides), Include range limits by default if min/max horizontal values match and certain conditions are met (for FreeSync monitors), restart.exe/restart64.exe: restart Radeon Settings (cnext.exe), Made range limits compatible with FreeSync monitors, Added basic support for range limits and serial number descriptors (use the "Edit..." button at the top), Show included descriptors in the detailed resolution list, Detailed resolutions: added "LCD reduced" timing parameters for 2560x1440 @ 144 Hz and higher resolutions, Extension block: added support for colorimetry and video capability data blocks, Redesigned icon to scale better with Windows 10's broken taskbar scaling, Fixed how disabled buttons appear with Windows 10, Detailed resolutions: added "LCD native" option, TV resolutions: added support for 4:2:0 resolutions, HDMI support: added support for HDMI resolutions, latency information, and supported content types, Fixed access violation in comctl32.dll message with higher DPI settings, Fixed layout issues with higher DPI settings and enabled DPI awareness, restart.exe/restart64.exe: implemented a better recovery mode, Added support for more than 8 standard resolutions (AMD/ATI only), Added support for other standard resolutions (NVIDIA only), Updated reset-all.exe to reset Windows resolution settings, Include new version of restart.exe/restart64.exe, Fixed HDMI audio not working with older ATI GPUs, Fixed monitors with invalid signal type information not working with AMD/ATI GPUs, Added "LCD standard" timing parameters for 3840x2160 @ 30 Hz and 1366x768 @ 60 Hz (use "LCD reduced" for old values), Automatically enable extension block when importing extension block files, Import extension block from files (editing coming later), Automatically fill in likely native resolution when adding a detailed resolution. Singer Regular & Ball Point Titanium Machine Needles, Sally's Grill And Hotpot Menu, Organic Floral Preservative, Social Media Operations Job Description, Lace Alumitone Split Wiring, Class 12 Biology Notes, Crocodile Shark Facts, " /> Display settings > Advanced display settings > Display adapter properties > Monitor tab, Windows Vista/7/8/8.1: right-click on the desktop > Screen resolution > Advanced settings > Monitor tab. Then the list should only have entries that are currently active. Custom Resolution Utility is a program for «screen acceleration» of the monitor (increasing screen refresh frequency). Since I have an ATI/AMD card, I followed Black Zero's link (can be found in video description) and then selected the link in his 3rd Edit. As of 2017 this problem is finally fixed with the newer Intel drivers. Custom Resolution Utility – CRU is an efficient software that is recommended by many Windows PC users. It’s called Custom Resolution Utility and you can download it here. Use VTB-EXT to add more standard resolutions. Option 1: Temporarily install the legacy… Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) is an EDID editor that focuses on custom resolutions. Note: NVIDIA requires at least 2 bytes left for data blocks or the driver may crash or ignore the override. Scaled Resolution Editor – Create a new program to edit the list of scaled resolutions that are automatically added by the graphics driver. Workarounds are no longer required for NVIDIA. List inactive displays with overrides installed, Display properties: interpret "0" ID serial number as blank, Detailed resolutions: "LCD reduced" will no longer go below 56 horizontal blanking, DisplayID detailed resolutions: fixed interlaced calculations to match DisplayID standard, HDMI 2.0 support: enable "SCDC present" by default when adding new data blocks, Added .csv file export: outputs comma-separated hexadecimal values (one block per line), Added .exe file export: outputs self-contained EDID override installers (includes alternative method for Intel GPUs), reset-all.exe: Reset alternative method for Intel GPUs, added /q option, restart.exe/restart64.exe: Faster restarts, recovery mode includes alternative method for Intel GPUs, added /r option, Speaker setup: added new speakers from CTA-861-G, HDMI support: fixed undefined latency data saving as 2 ms (since 1.3.99-p1), HDMI 2.0 support: preserve additional fields for HDMI 2.1, FreeSync range: added support for editing FreeSync 2 ranges, Added support for HDR static metadata blocks. Custom Resolution Utility - CRU makes it possible for users to define new resolutions for their AMD/ATI or NVIDIA GPUs on Windows Vista and later. Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) is an EDID editor that focuses on custom resolutions. Download and run the Custom Resolution Utility. Change timing to Automatic - LCD Standard. By Aaron P Brezenski, Published: ... in order to cope with monitor/video card driver mismatches, specialized software such as EnTech's excellent PowerStrip utility had to be used for all graphics cards, especially if you had overscan/underscan issues. Shifted the range up to 57-144 with CRU and it seems to work really well (though I'm still testing it out). "Automatic - LCD standard" uses standard timing parameters commonly used with LCD monitors and HDTVs. TUTORIAL STARTS AT 2:38really excited to get this tutorial out for you guys. Open the Intel Graphics Driver properties windows by pressing Ctrl + Alt + F12 or right-clicking on … This may help when trying higher refresh rates. Extension blocks that can't be read will appear as default extension blocks. Here's a screenshot: I just checked with a 1080p monitor. On the Display Devices tab, check if the Custom Resolutions/Modes button is available. Add custom resolutions, remove unwanted resolutions, edit FreeSync ranges, and more. What video card and monitor are you using? For HDMI monitors, edit the FreeSync data block in the first extension block. But there are a couple of … Add custom resolutions, remove unwanted resolutions, edit FreeSync ranges, and more. This is obviously bogus because the very same hardware does output that resolution in Ubuntu. Custom Resolution Utility 1.4.1 is available to all software users as a free download for Windows 10 PCs but also without a hitch on Windows 7 and Windows 8. This stops happening if I change the 60 Hz resolution to something like 59.94 Hz. Use detailed resolutions for other refresh rates. NVIDIA and newer AMD cards can handle some lower values depending on the resolution and refresh rate. Step 2: Open this tool and you can see the box of Detailed resolutions . Additional resolutions will use up detailed resolution slots. Using this software, you can change the resolution of a single monitor or even multimonitor setups. Restart the driver again to reload any changes. Do not add the native resolution as a standard resolution. The video card will not reduce clock speeds when idle if the vertical blanking/total is too low. Download: cru-1.4.2.zip - Source: cru-1.4.2-src.zip In the past, attempting to add custom resolutions/refresh rates on intel or switchable graphics in Windows was not possible. A word of warning: the application doesn’t work with Intel display adapters, and it functions by making edits to your registry. A separate x64 version may be available from ToastyX. Custom Resolution Utility – CRU is a Cleaning and Tweaking application like WinUtilities, Passware, and Uninstaller from ToastyX. I had a similar experience with my MG279Q. Use CEA-861 unless you need more standard resolutions. The program is a specialized tool, and it is likely that most Windows users have no need for it. CRU adds monitor resolutions, not scaled resolutions. Update Sept 22: The custom resolution editor within the official Intel Command Center is broken as of August 2020 - instead you can try the older "BETA" command center. 4th generation (Haswell) for Windows 7/8.1: Older Intel GPUs are supported using the alternative method described below. Display properties: added support for ID serial number in EDID header, Detailed resolutions: added "Automatic - Old standard" timing option for GTF, TV resolutions: added new resolutions from CTA-861-G (requires driver support), Colorimetry: added DCI-P3 standard from CTA-861-G, Fixed .inf export for Windows 10 Creators Update, Detailed resolutions: use CEA-861 timing parameters for 3840x2160 @ 60 Hz with "LCD standard" (use "LCD reduced" for old values), TV resolutions: disable "Native format" for resolutions that don't support this option, Do not add blank extension block if no extension blocks exist by default, Allow invalid but possible product IDs when editing display properties, Fixed '&' character in monitor name and serial number not displaying correctly in detailed resolutions list box, Improved row spacing between UI elements with higher DPI settings, Added support for reading extension blocks from connected monitors with AMD/ATI and NVIDIA, Automatically add blank extension block in registry and exported .inf files to work around NVIDIA driver issues, Added support for multiple extension blocks, Added support for importing other types of extension blocks, Added support for VTB-EXT extension blocks (detailed/standard resolutions only), Changed default TMDS clock to 340 MHz for new HDMI data blocks, Added support for HDMI FreeSync data blocks, Added BT.2020 formats in colorimetry data blocks, Added text file export (outputs hex values), Improved UI scaling with higher DPI settings, restart.exe/restart64.exe: fix Start menu, search box, and Radeon Settings not responding after restarting, Fixed a bug affecting non-PnP monitors since 1.2.3 (invalid EDID version with new overrides), Include range limits by default if min/max horizontal values match and certain conditions are met (for FreeSync monitors), restart.exe/restart64.exe: restart Radeon Settings (cnext.exe), Made range limits compatible with FreeSync monitors, Added basic support for range limits and serial number descriptors (use the "Edit..." button at the top), Show included descriptors in the detailed resolution list, Detailed resolutions: added "LCD reduced" timing parameters for 2560x1440 @ 144 Hz and higher resolutions, Extension block: added support for colorimetry and video capability data blocks, Redesigned icon to scale better with Windows 10's broken taskbar scaling, Fixed how disabled buttons appear with Windows 10, Detailed resolutions: added "LCD native" option, TV resolutions: added support for 4:2:0 resolutions, HDMI support: added support for HDMI resolutions, latency information, and supported content types, Fixed access violation in comctl32.dll message with higher DPI settings, Fixed layout issues with higher DPI settings and enabled DPI awareness, restart.exe/restart64.exe: implemented a better recovery mode, Added support for more than 8 standard resolutions (AMD/ATI only), Added support for other standard resolutions (NVIDIA only), Updated reset-all.exe to reset Windows resolution settings, Include new version of restart.exe/restart64.exe, Fixed HDMI audio not working with older ATI GPUs, Fixed monitors with invalid signal type information not working with AMD/ATI GPUs, Added "LCD standard" timing parameters for 3840x2160 @ 30 Hz and 1366x768 @ 60 Hz (use "LCD reduced" for old values), Automatically enable extension block when importing extension block files, Import extension block from files (editing coming later), Automatically fill in likely native resolution when adding a detailed resolution. 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custom resolution utility

It should work. For those of you who have or are considering Intel integrated graphics solutions, you may or may not have observed that the standard tool for coping with custom resolutions-- EnTech's Powerstrip-- doesn't work properly with Intel graphics. Intel GPUs and laptops with switchable graphics are supported with one of these drivers: Newer Intel GPUs are supported with the latest drivers. Currently supported GPUs are limited to some AMD/ATI and NVIDIA cards, as Intel GPUs are not supported. Compatibility with this custom resolution software may vary, but will generally run fine under Microsoft Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 7, Windows Vista and Windows XP on either a 32-bit or 64-bit setup. If you need to add an extension block manually, importing one of these files will provide a starting point: For DisplayPort monitors, use the "Edit..." button at the top to edit the range limits, and make sure "Include if slot available" is checked. Intel Graphics Driver for Windows [15.45], Intel Graphics Driver for Windows [15.40], Intel Graphics Driver for Windows 7/8.1 [15.36], Accell B086B-003B UltraAV DisplayPort 1.1 to HDMI 1.4 Active Adapter, Accell B086B-008B UltraAV Mini DisplayPort 1.1 to HDMI 1.4 Active Adapter, Accell B086B-006B UltraAV DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 1.4 Active Adapter, Accell B086B-007B UltraAV Mini DisplayPort 1.2 to HDMI 1.4 Active Adapter, http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?p=...ost1607421, https://dl.dropbox.com/u/102011983/high%...01080p.png, https://dl.dropbox.com/u/102011983/high%...nvidia.png, https://dl.dropbox.com/u/102011983/high%...nitor1.png, https://dl.dropbox.com/u/102011983/high%...nitor2.png, Windows Vista or later (Windows XP does not support EDID overrides), AMD/ATI or NVIDIA GPU with appropriate driver installed (Microsoft Basic Display Adapter driver does not support EDID overrides). 09/17/2019 Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) allows custom resolutions to be defined for both AMD/ATI and NVIDIA GPUs by creating EDID overrides directly in the registry without dealing with .inf files. "Automatic - CRT standard" uses timing parameters compatible with CRT monitors. Avoid using this option. The process to create custom resolutions with Custom Resolution Utility is quite similar to the NVIDIA Control Panel method. It's a quirk with the NVIDIA driver. COMMENTS. Free download provided for 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Windows. It will not copy the name or serial number, but it will copy the inclusion of these items using the display's own information. As a portable application, CRU does not require installation and can be run without installation. .bin - Raw binary EDID compatible with most EDID tools, .dat - Data file compatible with Phoenix EDID Designer and Advantiv EEditZ/EEditGold, .inf - Unsigned monitor driver compatible with Windows Vista and later, .txt - Text file containing whitespace-separated hexadecimal values (16 per line), .csv - Text file containing comma-separated hexadecimal values (one block per line), .exe - Self-contained EDID override installer (includes alternative method for Intel GPUs), /q - Restart without prompting (or rename the file to restart-only.exe), /r - Activate recovery mode without prompting. EDID editor that focuses on custom resolutions. Use detailed resolutions for other aspect ratios. CRU should pick the first active entry it finds, but if you're not sure which is which, delete all of them and reboot. I have no resolutions added from nvidia's control panel. AMD 7000-series and newer GPUs support up to 297 MHz. EDID Writer – Create a new program for Windows that can … It's possible you're editing the wrong one. More interestingly, after using Ubuntu for a few days, when I booted back to Windows, the 4K resolution was available. "Automatic - LCD native" uses standard timing parameters for the native refresh rate. Related Topics CRU Custom Resolution Utility Microsoft Surface Surface. Use Custom Resolution Utility (EDID method) [citation needed] Enable GPU scaling and set it to "Maintain aspect ratio". But you can set custom resolutions using a nifty third-party tool that you can grab for free. Use a DisplayID extension block to add resolutions with higher limits. Use detailed resolutions for other resolutions. More resolutions to choose from scratch, easy setup of new display settings, saving desktops right from the menu bar –there are plenty of helpful bits implemented in SwitchResX, that make life easier. More detailed resolutions can be added using extension blocks. Horizontal values can still be reduced if necessary. This may help when trying higher refresh rates. To set the refresh rate: Windows 10: right-click on the desktop > Display settings > Advanced display settings > Display adapter properties > Monitor tab, Windows Vista/7/8/8.1: right-click on the desktop > Screen resolution > Advanced settings > Monitor tab. Then the list should only have entries that are currently active. Custom Resolution Utility is a program for «screen acceleration» of the monitor (increasing screen refresh frequency). Since I have an ATI/AMD card, I followed Black Zero's link (can be found in video description) and then selected the link in his 3rd Edit. As of 2017 this problem is finally fixed with the newer Intel drivers. Custom Resolution Utility – CRU is an efficient software that is recommended by many Windows PC users. It’s called Custom Resolution Utility and you can download it here. Use VTB-EXT to add more standard resolutions. Option 1: Temporarily install the legacy… Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) is an EDID editor that focuses on custom resolutions. Note: NVIDIA requires at least 2 bytes left for data blocks or the driver may crash or ignore the override. Scaled Resolution Editor – Create a new program to edit the list of scaled resolutions that are automatically added by the graphics driver. Workarounds are no longer required for NVIDIA. List inactive displays with overrides installed, Display properties: interpret "0" ID serial number as blank, Detailed resolutions: "LCD reduced" will no longer go below 56 horizontal blanking, DisplayID detailed resolutions: fixed interlaced calculations to match DisplayID standard, HDMI 2.0 support: enable "SCDC present" by default when adding new data blocks, Added .csv file export: outputs comma-separated hexadecimal values (one block per line), Added .exe file export: outputs self-contained EDID override installers (includes alternative method for Intel GPUs), reset-all.exe: Reset alternative method for Intel GPUs, added /q option, restart.exe/restart64.exe: Faster restarts, recovery mode includes alternative method for Intel GPUs, added /r option, Speaker setup: added new speakers from CTA-861-G, HDMI support: fixed undefined latency data saving as 2 ms (since 1.3.99-p1), HDMI 2.0 support: preserve additional fields for HDMI 2.1, FreeSync range: added support for editing FreeSync 2 ranges, Added support for HDR static metadata blocks. Custom Resolution Utility - CRU makes it possible for users to define new resolutions for their AMD/ATI or NVIDIA GPUs on Windows Vista and later. Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) is an EDID editor that focuses on custom resolutions. Download and run the Custom Resolution Utility. Change timing to Automatic - LCD Standard. By Aaron P Brezenski, Published: ... in order to cope with monitor/video card driver mismatches, specialized software such as EnTech's excellent PowerStrip utility had to be used for all graphics cards, especially if you had overscan/underscan issues. Shifted the range up to 57-144 with CRU and it seems to work really well (though I'm still testing it out). "Automatic - LCD standard" uses standard timing parameters commonly used with LCD monitors and HDTVs. TUTORIAL STARTS AT 2:38really excited to get this tutorial out for you guys. Open the Intel Graphics Driver properties windows by pressing Ctrl + Alt + F12 or right-clicking on … This may help when trying higher refresh rates. Extension blocks that can't be read will appear as default extension blocks. Here's a screenshot: I just checked with a 1080p monitor. On the Display Devices tab, check if the Custom Resolutions/Modes button is available. Add custom resolutions, remove unwanted resolutions, edit FreeSync ranges, and more. What video card and monitor are you using? For HDMI monitors, edit the FreeSync data block in the first extension block. But there are a couple of … Add custom resolutions, remove unwanted resolutions, edit FreeSync ranges, and more. This is obviously bogus because the very same hardware does output that resolution in Ubuntu. Custom Resolution Utility 1.4.1 is available to all software users as a free download for Windows 10 PCs but also without a hitch on Windows 7 and Windows 8. This stops happening if I change the 60 Hz resolution to something like 59.94 Hz. Use detailed resolutions for other refresh rates. NVIDIA and newer AMD cards can handle some lower values depending on the resolution and refresh rate. Step 2: Open this tool and you can see the box of Detailed resolutions . Additional resolutions will use up detailed resolution slots. Using this software, you can change the resolution of a single monitor or even multimonitor setups. Restart the driver again to reload any changes. Do not add the native resolution as a standard resolution. The video card will not reduce clock speeds when idle if the vertical blanking/total is too low. Download: cru-1.4.2.zip - Source: cru-1.4.2-src.zip In the past, attempting to add custom resolutions/refresh rates on intel or switchable graphics in Windows was not possible. A word of warning: the application doesn’t work with Intel display adapters, and it functions by making edits to your registry. A separate x64 version may be available from ToastyX. Custom Resolution Utility – CRU is a Cleaning and Tweaking application like WinUtilities, Passware, and Uninstaller from ToastyX. I had a similar experience with my MG279Q. Use CEA-861 unless you need more standard resolutions. The program is a specialized tool, and it is likely that most Windows users have no need for it. CRU adds monitor resolutions, not scaled resolutions. Update Sept 22: The custom resolution editor within the official Intel Command Center is broken as of August 2020 - instead you can try the older "BETA" command center. 4th generation (Haswell) for Windows 7/8.1: Older Intel GPUs are supported using the alternative method described below. Display properties: added support for ID serial number in EDID header, Detailed resolutions: added "Automatic - Old standard" timing option for GTF, TV resolutions: added new resolutions from CTA-861-G (requires driver support), Colorimetry: added DCI-P3 standard from CTA-861-G, Fixed .inf export for Windows 10 Creators Update, Detailed resolutions: use CEA-861 timing parameters for 3840x2160 @ 60 Hz with "LCD standard" (use "LCD reduced" for old values), TV resolutions: disable "Native format" for resolutions that don't support this option, Do not add blank extension block if no extension blocks exist by default, Allow invalid but possible product IDs when editing display properties, Fixed '&' character in monitor name and serial number not displaying correctly in detailed resolutions list box, Improved row spacing between UI elements with higher DPI settings, Added support for reading extension blocks from connected monitors with AMD/ATI and NVIDIA, Automatically add blank extension block in registry and exported .inf files to work around NVIDIA driver issues, Added support for multiple extension blocks, Added support for importing other types of extension blocks, Added support for VTB-EXT extension blocks (detailed/standard resolutions only), Changed default TMDS clock to 340 MHz for new HDMI data blocks, Added support for HDMI FreeSync data blocks, Added BT.2020 formats in colorimetry data blocks, Added text file export (outputs hex values), Improved UI scaling with higher DPI settings, restart.exe/restart64.exe: fix Start menu, search box, and Radeon Settings not responding after restarting, Fixed a bug affecting non-PnP monitors since 1.2.3 (invalid EDID version with new overrides), Include range limits by default if min/max horizontal values match and certain conditions are met (for FreeSync monitors), restart.exe/restart64.exe: restart Radeon Settings (cnext.exe), Made range limits compatible with FreeSync monitors, Added basic support for range limits and serial number descriptors (use the "Edit..." button at the top), Show included descriptors in the detailed resolution list, Detailed resolutions: added "LCD reduced" timing parameters for 2560x1440 @ 144 Hz and higher resolutions, Extension block: added support for colorimetry and video capability data blocks, Redesigned icon to scale better with Windows 10's broken taskbar scaling, Fixed how disabled buttons appear with Windows 10, Detailed resolutions: added "LCD native" option, TV resolutions: added support for 4:2:0 resolutions, HDMI support: added support for HDMI resolutions, latency information, and supported content types, Fixed access violation in comctl32.dll message with higher DPI settings, Fixed layout issues with higher DPI settings and enabled DPI awareness, restart.exe/restart64.exe: implemented a better recovery mode, Added support for more than 8 standard resolutions (AMD/ATI only), Added support for other standard resolutions (NVIDIA only), Updated reset-all.exe to reset Windows resolution settings, Include new version of restart.exe/restart64.exe, Fixed HDMI audio not working with older ATI GPUs, Fixed monitors with invalid signal type information not working with AMD/ATI GPUs, Added "LCD standard" timing parameters for 3840x2160 @ 30 Hz and 1366x768 @ 60 Hz (use "LCD reduced" for old values), Automatically enable extension block when importing extension block files, Import extension block from files (editing coming later), Automatically fill in likely native resolution when adding a detailed resolution.

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